Blog

STRUDEL Reading Group Updates

Nov 8, 2017. | By: Sophie

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Alan Jaffe presented the paper Automatically Generating Commit Messages from Diffs Using Neural Machine Translation (Jiang et al., ASE 2017). It is an interesting application of the naturalness of code. I learned a lot about the idea of naturalness of code, as well as the fact that Alan is very good at baking pumpkin pies.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

No meeting this week. STRUDEL was away attending ASE in Urbana-Champaign, IL and visiting Fiona at the Cincinnati Zoo. #teamfiona

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

STRUDEL was proud to host Alexander Serebrenik from TU Eindhoven, who talked about his recent work on mining emotions from software engineering artifacts. We were all enjoying his talk as well as Sophie’s hazelnut wafel.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Sophie presented the paper “Simultaneously Uncovering the Patterns of Brain Regions Involved in Different Story Reading Subprocesses” (Wehbe et al., PLoS ONE 2014). The researchers scanned participants brains while they were reading the ninth chapter of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. They then trained a classifier that can distinguish which short passage the participants were reading based on the neural activity. The choice of this paper was to present group members another machine learning classifier that can process fMRI results. It was very nice and sweet that David made apple raisin strudels.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Marat presented the paper “Romantic partnerships and the dispersion of social ties: a network analysis of relationship status on facebook” (Backstrom et al, CSCW 2014). This paper proposed to use dispersion, which measures “the extent to which two people’s mutual friends are not themselves well-connected,” in addition to embeddedness, which measures the number of mutural friends, to predict if two Facebook users are in a romantic relationship. The accuracy of prediction increased significantly when using the dispersion metric. Somehow, my impression of the paper smells like homemade banana bread.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

David presented the paper “Automatically Diagnosing and Repairing Error Handling Bugs in C” (Tian and Ray, ESEC/FSE 2017). This paper presents how to identify different types of bugs and how to correct them in C/C++ code. Happy Mid-autumn festival and thanks Sophie for her mooncake!

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Jeremy presented the paper “Decoding the representation of code in the brain: An fMRI study of code review and expertise” (Floyd et al, ICSE 2017). The researchers scanned participants’ brain while they were reviewing code or prose. The findings suggest that reading code differs from reading natural language, but less so for experts than for novices.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

We had our first reading group meeting today! To celebrate, Bogdan brought apple-cinnamon strudels for us. Nevertheless, these strudles were not as good as our discussion on the paper “Fairness Testing: Testing Software for Discrimination” (Galhotra et al, ESEC/FSE 2017) that Bogdan presented at the meeting.

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Paper presented at ASE 2017

Oct 31, 2017. | By: Bogdan

We were at ASE 2017 presenting the paper:

The Impact of Continuous Integration on Other Software Development Practices: A Large-Scale Empirical Study, with Yangyang Zhao, Alexander Serebrenik, Yuming Zhou, and Vladimir Filkov.

More details about the research here. PDF here. Slides here.

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Third place for Alan in the SRC!

Sep 8, 2017. | By: Bogdan

Congratulations to Alan who placed third in the ACM Student Research Competition at ESEC/FSE 2017 this year!

Check out his work on suggesting meaningful variable names for decompiled code.

More details about the research here.

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Paper accepted at SWAN 2017

Jul 4, 2017. | By: Bogdan

We just had a paper accepted at SWAN 2017!

Timezone and Time-of-Day Variance in GitHub Teams: An Empirical Method and Study, with Prem Devanbu, Pallavi Kudigrama, and Cindy Rubio-González from UC Davis.

One of the coolest parts of the paper is the novel use of circular statistics. Did you know that traditional summary statistics (like the mean) are invalid for circular variables like the clock and angles? Here’s an example of circular histograms showing when people made commits in two GitHub projects. Check out the preprint for more details.

Abstract:

Open source projects based in ecosystems like GitHub seamlessly allow distributed software development. Contributors to some GitHub projects may originate from many different timezones; in others they may all reside in just one timezone. How might this timezone dispersion (or concentration) affect the diurnal distribution of work activity in these projects? In commercial projects, there has been a desire to use top-down management and work allocation to exploit timezone dispersion of project teams, to engender a more round-the-clock work cycle. We focus on GitHub, and explore the relationship between timezone dispersion and work activity dispersion. We find that while time-of-day work activity dispersion is indeed associated strongly with timezone dispersion, it is equally (if not more strongly) affected by project team size.

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Paper accepted at ESEC/FSE 2017

Jun 2, 2017. | By: Bogdan

We just had a paper accepted at ESEC/FSE 2017!

Recovering Clear, Natural Identifiers from Obfuscated JavaScript Names, with Casey Casalnuovo and Prem Devanbu from UC Davis.

More details about the research here.

Try out our tool online.

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STRUDEL is hosting 3 REU students

May 29, 2017. | By: Bogdan

We are thrilled to announce the arrival of 3 students participating in the Carnegie Mellon 2017 Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Software Engineering:

  • Anita Brown, from Bryn Mawr College
  • Asher Trockman, from University of Evansville
  • Jacob Hoffman, from Carnegie Mellon

Looking forward to a productive summer!

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Our new logo is here

May 19, 2017. | By: Bogdan

Thanks to Josh Quicksall’s amazing talents, the STRUDEL lab has a new logo! Can you spot where Josh got his inspiration from?

STRUDEL (Image from: http://lacasapane.ro/en/shop/sour-cherry-strudel/)

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Our Pastry Shop

Wean Hall 5115, Institute for Software Research
School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA, 15213 USA